Follow me on Twitter @bookkaz

Wednesday, 24 July 2019

#20BooksOfSummer MAN WITH A SEAGULL ON HIS HEAD by HARRIET PAIGE #bookreview



Finally I'm back with another book finished off the list!  This was book 10 and another one from my 'little' list, where it's under 200 pages.  I think that is 7 books read now from my 'little' list so I really need to up my game on the 'large' book front - if only there weren't so many other books I need to read for blog tours and publication dates!!

And what a stunner of a book this was!  I don't know if I connected to it more because it was set very locally to me, but I just found it to be so absorbing and touching!


A gull falls from the sky and strikes a council worker on the beach below. From that moment on he is obsessed, a crazed visionary depicting the scene and the unknown figure with in who filled his view at the moment of impact. The mysterious beauty of his creations draws others to him, but can they lay hold of that which possesses him? And what of his anonymous muse?

'A bona fide gem. A book that would be a credit on any short list.'Guardian


PUBLISHED BY BlueMoose Books


PURCHASE LINKS


hive.co.uk  £6.25

WHSmith  £6.47



MY REVIEW

Quirky and poignant - my kind of book! And set in the south east corner of Essex that I know so well, this was a wonderfully touching little read that made a very hot afternoon fly by.

Centred around Ray Eccles who lives a quiet life in a quiet cul-de-sac in Southend On Sea, he's a succesful artist but you'd never know it to see him. Happy to stay out of the limelight and keep to himself - but that all changes when he has a rather unfortunate incident on Shoebury East Beach with a seagull. Witnessed by one woman, he returns home from hospital with her face on his mind and starts his obsession with her that takes over his whole artistic outlook and sees him paint the same scene for 10 years.

The woman who saw the incident with the seagull has her own quiet life - working in a clothes shop, living a normal life but when the work of Ray Eccles becomes a huge success, she knows that the face he is painting is her. She doesn't know how to feel about it and the struggle she faces is brilliantly portrayed.

The whole cast of charaters in this book are such a wonderful mix of the good and bad sides of humanity. The art studio owners who look upon Ray as their pet project when they take his work to London and have him move in with them, the local reporter from the Evening Echo trying to make her name with a breaking story, and especially Ray himself who never escapes his 'oddball' personna and seems happiest when he's doing his own thing and not living by the rules of normal life.

I loved the touching and human side of the story and the familiarity of the places visited really brought this to life for me - any book that features Keddies is fine by me! It had a great mix of humour and tragedy, and the absurd side of the art world where anything seems to go if it has the right PR behind it, no matter the effect on the artist who was just trying to make sense of what happened to him and dealing with his grief and loneliness.

A stunning little book and one I'm very glad to have read!

★★★★


















No comments:

Post a Comment