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Saturday, 16 October 2021

My Bookish Weekly Wrap Up - 16th October 2021

 


Hello and Happy Saturday!! Weather has improved again this week so it's been nice to enjoy some time outdoors and the longer, darker nights mean it's candle time! I may have treated myself to a couple from TK Maxx this week! Spoiled for choice there!!

And I've been spoiled on the book front this week  - managed to finish 4 books, got some lovely books through the post and 2 newbies to the netgalley shelf!! The TBR mountain grows ever taller!!

Here's my look back...

BOOKS FINISHED










BOOKHAUL

Starting with the Netgalley additions....

THE PARIS BOOKSELLER by KERRI MAHER

publication  - January 2022

The captivating story of a trailblazing young woman who fought against incredible odds to bring one of the most important books of the twentieth century to the world. For readers of The Paris LibraryThe Age of Light and The Paris Wife.

PARIS, 1919.


Young, bookish Sylvia Beach knows there is no greater city in the world than Paris. But when she opens an English-language bookshop on the bohemian Left Bank, Sylvia can't yet know she is making history.

Many leading writers of the day, from Ernest Hemingway to Gertrude Stein, consider Shakespeare and Company a second home. Here some of the most profound literary friendships blossom - and none more so than between James Joyce and Sylvia herself.

When Joyce's controversial novel Ulysses is banned, Sylvia determines to publish it through Shakespeare and Company. But the success and notoriety of publishing the most infamous book of the century comes at deep personal cost as Sylvia risks ruin, reputation and her heart in the name of the life-changing power of books...


FEMLANDIA by CHRISTINA DALCHER

The explosive new thriller from the bestselling author of VOX and Q
Welcome to Femlandia… It’s no place like home.

'Provocative, sinister, and fascinating' Stephanie Wrobel, Sunday Times bestselling author of The Recovery of Rose Gold


The United States has sunk into total collapse.

Men in positions of power have wrecked the economy and left women to suffer and pick up the pieces.

Miranda Reynolds has lost her husband, her job and her home. There’s only one place left that she and her daughter Emma can go. Femlandia.

Femlandia is a female-only community. A utopia for women. There’s a reason Miranda never joined before. Now she has no choice.

With what Miranda knows about Femlandia’s founder, she’s right to be wary. While life outside the gates is fraught with danger, there’s something just as sinister going on within.


I was also very lucky to win a copy of this via HWA


SANDS OF THE ARENA by BEN KANE

From Sunday Times Bestselling author Ben Kane comes a collection of short stories:

Sands of the Arena

Can a wet-behind-the-ears gladiator survive a bloody contest ordered by Emperor Caligula?

The Shrine
Centurion Tullus discovers that Fate will always hold him in her grip.

The Arena
Legionary Piso's much anticipated payday plays out very differently than he expected.

Eagles in the East
Caught up in a bloody rebellion, Centurion Tullus battles to keep his men alive.

Eagles in the Wilderness
Bored with retirement, Centurion Tullus takes service with an amber merchant, voyaging to unknown, dangerous lands far beyond the empire.

Hannibal: Good Omens
History's most famous general seeks the gods' approval before his war with Rome.

The March
Romulus and Tarquinius travel to the ends of the earth, searching for their lost friend Brennus.


Then I treated myself over at Eye Books - and got 3 for the price of 2!

SOUR GRAPES by DAN RHODES

When the sleepy English village of Green Bottom hosts its first literary festival, the good, the bad and the ugly of the book world descend upon its leafy lanes.

But the villagers are not prepared for the peculiar habits, petty rivalries and unspeakable desires of the authors. And they are certainly not equipped to deal with Wilberforce Selfram, the ghoul-faced, ageing enfant terrible who wreaks havoc wherever he goes.

Sour Grapes is a hilarious satire on the literary world which takes no prisoners as it skewers authors, agents, publishers and reviewers alike.


STONE HEART DEEP by PAUL BASSETT DAVIES

Stone Heart Deep is a compelling and claustrophobic thriller with a remarkable twist, as if Iain Banks had rewritten The Wicker Man.

When burned-out investigative journalist Adam Budd’s estranged mother dies, he inherits her estate. This includes Stone Heart House, a huge, ramshackle mansion on a remote Scottish island. He visits the island to sort out her tangled affairs, and at first it seems like a charming haven of tranquillity. But after he witnesses a strange accident, he begins to develop suspicions about the inhabitants.

Why does everyone seem so eerily calm, even under stress? What is stopping Harriet, the lawyer helping him with his affairs, from leaving the island when she so clearly wants to? Is he making a big mistake by falling for her? And why have so many children gone missing?


THE DROVER'S WIVES by RYAN O'NEILL
Henry Lawson’s short story The Drover’s Wife is an Australian classic that has sparked interpretations on the page, on canvas and on the stage. But it has never been so thoroughly, or hilariously, reimagined as by Ryan O’Neill, remixing and revising Lawson’s masterpiece in 101 different ways.

The variations include a a pop song, a sporting commentary, a 1980s computer game, an insurance claim, a Hollywood movie adaptation, a cryptic crossword and even the selection of paint swatches you can see on this back cover.

Inventive and unexpected, this is laugh-out-loud literature from the author of the award-winning Their Brilliant Careers.

OROONOKO by APHRA BEHN
my subscription copy from RENARD PRESS


When Prince Oroonoko's passion for the virtuous Imoinda arouses the jealousy of his grandfather, the lovers are cast into slavery and transported from Africa to the colony of Surinam. Oroonoko's noble bearing soon wins the respect of his English captors, but his struggle for freedom brings about his destruction. Inspired by Aphra Behn's visit to Surinam, Oroonoko reflects the author's romantic views of native peoples as being in "the first state of innocence, before man knew how to sin." The novel also reveals Behn's ambiguous attitude toward slavery: while she favored it as a means to strengthen England's power, her powerful and moving work conveys its injustice and brutality.


CURRENTLY READING




HAPPY READING!!


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